How to love non-exotic technology: And use it to decarbonise, achieve cybersecurity, and improve organisational health…

Amazon.co.uk Price: £0.80 (as of 26/11/2021 18:27 PST- Details)

Digital technology offers the most value when it gives people exactly the right information and support at the right time. But that is not the technology which gets the most attention.The exotic technologies get the most attention – like AI/ML, blockchain, and augmented reality. But it is proving very hard for these technologies to make value, and perhaps they only provide value when handled in a very non exotic way, with careful modelling.To make technology which can give people the right support at the right time is very difficult work – with large amounts of modelling or map making – understanding what exactly would be most helpful. And there is also a lot of data management, governance, standards and integration behind it (not covered in this book).This is a frustration shared by many people who work with digital technology for organisations.Many people in the digital technology industry respond to this challenge by trying to make exotic technologies sound even more exciting and relevant to the needs of organisations. Or they bury the difficult work of modelling technologies to people’s needs behind fashionable concepts like agile sprints.We propose a bold alternative approach – showing how we can love non-exotic technologies – by focussing on what we can do with them. And we show how it can help decarbonise, improve cybersecurity, improve organisational health in general, and improve e-learning.Technology could do much more to help people do their work better.But we don’t talk about this much. What we talk about, when we talk about technology, is technology itself.That is something very different. For example, technology which can analyse videos, drive cars, beat the world champion in a game, and learn how to do something new. For the purposes of this book, these can be called “exotic technologies”.Technology which can help people do their work better could be considered “non exotic technology”, because it might not look like very much, in itself. It may be possible to build using old, cheap technology platforms, so not require any new software purchases. Like an old car which you use to go somewhere new.Building non exotic technology is not easy. It requires a lot of hard dedicated work by people in the middle who understand both people and technology, and are good at reducing complex concepts to maps which other people and machines can easily understand.But this technology could help people with expertise to make better decisions to faster decarbonise society within commercial constraints. Or help people make more effective schedules so organisations can achieve more with less resources.Cybersecurity could be improved if people could better gain situation awareness about what is going on, rather than assuming that technology problems need technological solutions.Online learning products could be improved if they could better work together with the expertise of a teacher who has worked in the same domain.

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Digital technology offers the most value when it gives people exactly the right information and support at the right time. But that is not the technology which gets the most attention.The exotic technologies get the most attention – like AI/ML, blockchain, and augmented reality. But it is proving very hard for these technologies to make value, and perhaps they only provide value when handled in a very non exotic way, with careful modelling.To make technology which can give people the right support at the right time is very difficult work – with large amounts of modelling or map making – understanding what exactly would be most helpful. And there is also a lot of data management, governance, standards and integration behind it (not covered in this book).This is a frustration shared by many people who work with digital technology for organisations.Many people in the digital technology industry respond to this challenge by trying to make exotic technologies sound even more exciting and relevant to the needs of organisations. Or they bury the difficult work of modelling technologies to people’s needs behind fashionable concepts like agile sprints.We propose a bold alternative approach – showing how we can love non-exotic technologies – by focussing on what we can do with them. And we show how it can help decarbonise, improve cybersecurity, improve organisational health in general, and improve e-learning.Technology could do much more to help people do their work better.But we don’t talk about this much. What we talk about, when we talk about technology, is technology itself.That is something very different. For example, technology which can analyse videos, drive cars, beat the world champion in a game, and learn how to do something new. For the purposes of this book, these can be called “exotic technologies”.Technology which can help people do their work better could be considered “non exotic technology”, because it might not look like very much, in itself. It may be possible to build using old, cheap technology platforms, so not require any new software purchases. Like an old car which you use to go somewhere new.Building non exotic technology is not easy. It requires a lot of hard dedicated work by people in the middle who understand both people and technology, and are good at reducing complex concepts to maps which other people and machines can easily understand.But this technology could help people with expertise to make better decisions to faster decarbonise society within commercial constraints. Or help people make more effective schedules so organisations can achieve more with less resources.Cybersecurity could be improved if people could better gain situation awareness about what is going on, rather than assuming that technology problems need technological solutions.Online learning products could be improved if they could better work together with the expertise of a teacher who has worked in the same domain.

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Author

Karl Jeffery

Author 2

Dimitris Lyras

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